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secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and the climate in 1963. because i don't think people understand th
whites only." we cannot be satisfied as long as the negro in mississippi cannot vote and the negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. no, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream. i am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution, and staggered by the winds of police brutality. you have been the veterans of creative suffering. continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redememptive. go back to mississippi. go back to alabama. go back to south carolina. go back to georgia, go back to louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities. knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. let us not wallow in the valley of despair. i say to you today, my friends -- [ cheers and applause ] >> -- though even though we face the difficulties of today a
trying to change b this country. he was the naacp's first field secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and th
and thunderstorms east of the mississippi. and the heaviest, from new york down to the carolinas. >> upper 70s from boston to new york. 80s in the midwest. 90s in the southeast. triple digits for dallas and phoenix. >>> innovative fast food. wait until you see the breakfast treat taco bell is rolling out in more areas. >> it's a good one. >>> plus, a hot air balloon plummets to the ground with an american family onboard. and the prominent california man killed in the crash. >>> a heart scare for george w. bush. the former president waking up in a hospital. why doctors decided to operate >>> checking out to be another nervous day on wall street, as stocks open lower for the second-straight day. the dow lost 93 points on fears that the federal reserve could begin pulling back on its massive infusion of cash that's been so popular with traders. >>> the feds are going after bank of america as the government tries to clean up the behavior that led to the great recession. the justice department is suing b of a for allegedly lying to investors about the risks of the toxic loans that led to the housing col
louisiana's northeast border near mississippi. alina, what you can tell us? >> reporter: zoraida, this is still a very active scene. we're going to zoom into the bank so you can see the police remain here. investigators continue to comb the bank for vefd. now louisiana state police have identified the alleged hostage-taker as 20-year-old fuaed abdo ahmed. authorities say ahmed walked into this tensas state bank with a gun and took three employees hostage-over the course of 12 you hours, ahmed made several demands, even leased a female hostage. just before midnight, local time, a s.w.a.t. team stormed the bank because the gunman, according to police, threatened to kill the hostages. ahmed was shot dead. police say he shot dead both hostages before he was killed. the man and women were taken to separate hospitals in the area. at last check, according to police, they are listed in critical condition, zoraida. >> alina, thank you very much. we'll continue to check in with you there. >>> we're going to turn now to cairo, we have majoring troubling developments overnight. police have m
28th, 1955, emmett till was dragged from his cousin's home in mississippi and lynched. that lynching was part of what launched a civil rights movement. in 1963 on august 28th, dr. king stood and articulated a dream for the nation. on august 28th, 2008, president obama or then senator obama stood and accepted the nomination of the democratic party for the u.s. presidency. today, he will speak to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march. from that lynching on august 28th to this moment of an african-american president on august 28th, there have been real accomplishments. there have been real changes. we have to acknowledge that, in fact, we have made progress as a country. at the same time, that we must absolutely recognize the continuing structural barriers that exist in terms of economic inequality, unfairness in the workplace, lack of opportunity in housing, often lack of opportunity in education from k through 12, as well as in higher education, and, of course, the realities of continuing residential segregation that impact everything from our health to our opportunities to ge
and mississippi. notice toward the mid-atlantic, the moisture and chance for showers, nothing like the south. either way, the clouds are moving in. heavy rain toward texas. still raining in the southeast. we are talking about the combination bringing eight inches of rain that have been soaked. >> the rain is really stuck there in the southeast. >> this unbelievable amount of rain. this summer, we have seen way over, 10 to 15 inches over. >> how many inches of rain have they seen? >> every place is different but some ten to 15. >> thank you. >>> kind of good news/bad news. it's a deal for the believers convinced we are not alone on the universe. do you believe this? >> yeah. >> the cia is officially acknowledging the existence of super secret area 51. the documents include a map of the location in the nevada desert. would you go, berman? >> mm-hmm. >> you would? >> mm-hmm. >> they said it's a testing sight for surveillance during the cold war. >> you believe that? >> i do. >> if they are not doing the alien autopsies there, where are they doing them? they are doing them somewhere? >> yeah. i'
on the death list in mississippi and he took it upon himself to train our children what to do in case they heard gunfire. that's exactly what they did that night. each other helped each other to the bathroom to get in the tub and my screams stopped them from completing that hiding point. but we knew, you live with death threats constantly and you adapt your life to that. you might argue, but you don't leave without the embrace. you might become angry with things that are happening around you, but it's a time of support. it's a time of pulling people together. and during that time, we had the ages divided. there were the young people and there were the older people. those in the middle were more or less teachers who were a little afraid to speak up and stand out. medgarr stood alone in that battle. he did have supporters, of course, but he was the point person and it was extremely difficult for us as a family to live with that. but you lived as though every day was going to be your last together. it sounds a little sad but that's the way it was. >> one of your themes in your speech on
secretary of the naacp in mississippi, civil rights leader medgar evers organized voter registration efforts. evers was assassinated in 1963 mere months before the march on washington. since then as a civil rights activist and former executive director of the naacp, his widow myrlie evers williams has carried on his legacy. she joins me sitting rights here, along with joy reid, manager the grio and msnbc contributor. i have been chasing after you, joy. i see you everywhere but here. now i've got you here finally. you are very smart about this stuff. and i know you're from the younger generation. i want to get myrlie on this too. i want you to react to this. a couple of things. it's not just minority voters that benefit from traditional voting patterns. the easier way to vote, younger people have a harder time budgeting their time. they just do for whatever reason. the easier it is to vote, the more are going to vote. african-american voters, many don't have money to have a car, don't have a driver's license, may be older living in row houses like i used to live as a kid, and they basically h
. because of that there are still flash flood warnings and regular warnings up and down the mississippi river because of the potential for more flooding. also the threat of severe storms from southeastern montana into parts of kansas where we could end up with large hail and damaging winds. a few tornadoes are possible but they should be brief. this is most likely later this afternoon and into this evening. the plains really do not need anymore rain right now. >> absolutely. it could be a busy weather day. >>> straight ahead, the fbi let informants commit over 5600 crimes. powerball is over $400 million. >>> a frightening report of what dirty car sellers are doing that only a trusted mechanic can save you from. "first look" is back in three. right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. h
continues in the south with temperatures near or above 100 degrees from texas to mississippi. and the atlantic coast will see its share of wet weather. >>> in sports, the los angeles angels just can't seem to solve the texas rangers. in the first inning the angels tie the game at 2-2 on back-to-back homers, but in the eighth, rangers' third baseman adrian beltre slaps an rbi single to right field to break a 3-3 tie. texas adds four runs in the ninth for an 8-3 win. >>> and some gnatty finance between nl east rivals washington and atlanta. bryce harper gives the nationals a 1-0 lead when he homers to center field. the next time bryce harper comes to the plate, he's hit by a pitch and tempers flair as he heads toward first base. while the benches were cleared, no punches were thrown, no one was ejected. the braves win, 2-1, their 12th straight victory. >>> and, finally, it's hard enough to bowl a perfect game, but the way one bowler lost his bid for a 300 was heartbreaking. >> looking for perfection, 300. come on, ball. oh, my god. >> oh, no. >> holy cow. did you see that? >> o
percent. only mississippi had a decline from 9 percent down to 8.5 percent. unemployment fell in 8 states and was unchanged in 14 states. in seattle considering raising their minimum wage to $15 an hour. the state has the heist minimum rate at $9.19 an hour. the mayoral candidates say they will consider this. it may make it more difficult for major rekalers to operate there. wal-mart refused to accept a decision to raise minimum wage to 12.50 an hour. according to a british survey the average officer suffered death raids twice a day computer crashes and rude clients and computer failure. >> the survey found 51 percent of friends experience serial work with aaroning not having a proper time for lunch. they get stressed out over technology malfunctions not surprisingly 42 percent of workers are most wound up and i am patie impatient on a monday. good news, guys, today is tuesday. >>> are you guilty of your own desk rage? tweet us at fox frien foxfriendsfirst@foxnews.com and let us know. >>> it is 10 minutes after the top of the hour. coming up they are supposed to catch you or me if you bre
of the -- and i came up from mississippi where i had been working with the student nonviolent coordination committee in the mississippi delta, and i was standing right up there near the lincoln statue where the people are gathered all on the steps then. i guess post 9/11, you can't have them so close, and i remember that the best view was not when i would come down and look up. the best view was when i would look out and see that the march, which had a lot of doubt hanging over it, would people really come, because there had never been a mass march on washington before for any cause. would they come? how would they be received and here, i could not see the end of the people. march by any measure had been a success, more people for any cause had gathered on this space 50 years ago. >> we thank you for taking the time now to help us remember that day 50 years ago and educate many of us who don't remember it, but know of its power in the history books. thanks so much. our live coverage of the march in washington continues next hour. former d.c. mayor, marian berry, will be joining us live. he
that these were phoneo scandals like the mississippi river they keep rolling and keeps getting bigger. i think the republicans are doing well. i think they are very methodical and are not hysterical. they are pursuing it and it will take time but they are pulling on it a thread at a time. >> what about that? if it starts expanding beyond the irs that starts to become more of a problem for the administration. >> they are not supposed to share information but the threat would be that they are sharing information for political purposes to undermine conservatives. in this situation that is not clear. they shared it with the enforcement division of the federal elections commission. so there could be a legitimate reason to see if somebody has tax exempt status to see what they are requesting and then requesting similar status from irs. we don't know. but the idea is and i think that there was testimony from lerner that there had been no sharing of data whatsoever. so now we have an exception to the rule apparently and of course that compounds all the suspicious about lerner and the fact that she has
. this is during a routine dive in mississippi. this is a 66-year-old who was doing a tandem dive. the student is in critical condition with broken bones and a head injury. the owner said the instructor cut away his main parachute and used backup but it's not clear what went wrong. the faa is investigating this along with local authorities. >>> a man who saw a car mow down 13 pedestrians, this is on l.a.'s venice beach. the driver was looking for blood. >> reporter: you see the suspect's car plowing in and swerving around barriers. >> the just drove and took that barrier down and bodies were scattering and flying in the air and people were screaming and it was absolute mayhem. >> reporter: a second camera angle shows the driver getting out casing the boardwalk. ghets back in and floors it. >> he has to have pressed foot to the gas because tires started screeching. he was looking for blood. that guy's intention was to kill people. >> reporter: an italian tourist on her honeymoon was killed and 11 others injured in a scene a quarter mile long. the suspect is nathan campbell of los angeles. just
york, but i'm a mississippi girl. i like the braves. >> a view on a-rod, playing tonight. not playing well. but he has $175,000 after being exposed as a cheat. >> i think he could care less at this point. he's made a ton of money. set some records. he feel, ah, my legacy is set in other ways. i could care less what would michael have thought? not a lot, i suspect. >> jo think he was really at the top of michael's list of concerns in life. michael was believer in fairness and i don't think he would have approved of a-rod necessarily. >> were you surprised by the incredible outpouring of attention that michael's death got? the tributes and accolades that came? >> i think it's a real testament to his legacy and what he stood for, and you know, what a passionate supporter he was of liberty, of human rights, of freedom. of the right to free speech, and so i was definitely, it meant so much to me. all the lovely thing that people, and your tribute. thank you so much for that, too. >> an incredible force. a brave, courageous man. it's desperately sad. for us, everyone in the media and the vi
in the united states, and not alabama or mississippi. we're talking about new york city, madison avenue. >> have you experienced it in new york? >> not as much because new york is sort of my city, and i tend to go places where i'm expected. i think in someways, i've started to do that because i don't want to have these kinds of experiences. >> so you're almost avoiding it? >> exactly. i have been, you know, passed up by a taxi driver. i've also had a taxi driver yell something foul at me -- >> both of us. >> i have been. i might be more -- >> just because i'm annoying. >> where as i've had some foul "n" word yelled at me on a new york city street. >> have you really? >> absolutely in the middle of the street. >> they aren't talking to me. it's not what they call you, it's what you answer to. i know what i am and i won't allow anybody to put me in a box. >> has it gotten better since the first black president of the united states or not? >> yeah, it's not so much that it's gotten better. i think it's become more of a conversation, and, you know, the race conversation is one that black america has
who had gone to mississippi to visit his family. he was in a store. he made a comment about a white woman and that led to him being picked up by a bunch of racists and murdered. that was the emmitt till reference. >> brutally murdered. >> to say the least. >> shot through the head, thrown into the river. >> all for making a comment about a white woman that was not all that offensive. >> was it fair to to relate the trayvon martin case -- >> i don't think so. till became a symbol for that era and i don't think that was the right example. >> i don't know. i think there will always be a difference of opinion and it will never change, so why don't we just move on. i think oprah can have a lot of fun with us by constantly saying things every day, seeing if we will cover it. like you know what, i don't want mayonnaise on my tuna fish sandwich. then "the five" the next day will go tuna fish, really, oprah, tuna fish and mayonnaise? what is wrong with you! what is happening to you! could this hurt your brand? >> i like mayonnaise! >> i hate tuna fish but love mayonnaise. >> it is weird, yo
of the flood mitigation program that the corps of engineers engages in, we are losing much of the mississippi delta. up theseeep putting barriers to keep the channel of the river to keep it from going onto croplands and housing developments, you are losing all the silt to create the barrier islands to build up that delta to allow for the land to keep being recharged. this is part of the law of unintended consequences. housingep encouraging development closer and closer to coasts and rivers, you are losing nature's ability to mitigate itself. guest: you are absolutely right. that is one of the issues of how we manage the mississippi river and how it affects louisiana along with natural subsidence and the issues of canals for oil and gas drilling and the of those nature. provided are has withe either to wetlands dunes and beaches and as we encroach on that, we are reducing the ability for mother nature to respond and be able to protect us and that increases our flood losses. hurricane result of sandy, more than 30,000 buildings in new york city were in a flood controlled area that is now -- th
. make no mistake, president obama believes there mississippi be accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons against the world's most vulnerable people. nothing today is more serious and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. thank you. >> i'm trace gallagher in for shepard smith. just heard secretary of said john kerry giving his first accounts of the crisis in syria. the secretary delivers litany of what they believe is the proof that chemical weapons were used in syria. as important as what he laid out is what when he did not lay out, is a time line of dealing with syria, going after the regimes. what the did lay out there have to be consequences for any action, any chemical weapon used and said the president at some point in time will decide what to do but made it very, very clear the secretary of state believes there will be some type of action used against sirra, but keep in mind, we have u.n. inspectors on the ground, and seemed to indicate that did not matter. the inspectors would fine there was the use of chemical weapons but could not determine
think it's like meals on wheels. you take big issues like social security. in rural areas of mississippi and alabama where there are a lot of poor people of both backgrounds black and white, they aren't on plantations. these are workers. and they really care about these basic social programs. and yet obama fights for them and they don't ally with them. >> they don't. and they think they will be better off on their own. >> i know you're friends with bill cosby and i in ways worship the guy. here's when the president didn't get away from delivering a tough message. he didn't sound like the lefty socialist his critics on the right portray him as. here he is. >> if we're honest with ourselves, we'll admit that during the course of 50 years, there were times when some of us claiming to push for change lost our way. the anguish of assassinations set off self-defeating riots. legitimate grievances against police brutality tipped into excuse making for criminal behavior. and what had once been a call for equality of opportunity, the chance for all americans to work hard and get ahead was too oft
-old emmitt till was murdered by two white men in mississippi for flirting with a white woman. he was tortured and beaten and shot in the head. the murderers were acquitted and months later they admitted to the killing. a day never to forget. but today we also remember a hopeful day. five years ago today, senator barack obama accepted the democratic nomination for president in 2008. the arc of history bending toward justice. that's why we in our own way must never stop marching, never stop fighting, never stop doing whatever it is we can do. because at the end, right will always overpower wrong. and as the president quoted an old gospel song today, weeping may endure for a night. but if you keep going, joy will definitely come in the morning. we need to keep going because there are mornings that are waiting us if we would just fight through the night. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now.
in the '60s and -- >> in mississippi. >> yeah, and i'm a -- not only that a student of my history. i've said this many times, it's not a part of who i am to use that word, i understand why other people do. it's impossible for me to do it because i know the history, and i know that for so many of my relatives whom i don't know, who i don't know by name, people i'm connected to, my ancestors, that was the last word they heard as they were being strung up by a tree. that was the last sense of degradation that they experienced as, you know, some harm was caused to them. i just -- it's just not a part of the fabric of who i am. so out of respect to those who've come before and the price that they paid to rid themselves of being relegated to that word, i just don't use it. >> i understand lee daniels said that he used to use the word, and you two had a discussion -- >> i said lee, you ain't going to be using that word around me. lee, no you're not going to use that word around me. and i think it's used appropriately in the film. i mean, i think, you know, in the moment where the clearance williams
in meridian, mississippi in an integrated school. and went to school at university of alabama at a very integrated campus and at a campus that in the 1980s was actually handling racial issues a lot better than a lot of campuses across the northeast. but martin luther king not only did for america but what he did for his home region of the south, a region that had been scarred by racism and racial tensions for years. to see how quickly things -- he gave this speech the year i was born in a segregated south and segregated america. by the time i started first grade in meridian mississippi it w was integrated. that is nothing short of extraordinary and that is a legacy that we put first at the feet of martin luther king and also all the civil rights workers and protesters and leaders who gave their all to make sure that white children like myself and black children who were my friends, who i played football with in first grade and baseball with in first grade, would go to school together. that was the normal. that was normal for me. let me -- al, let me go to you quickly here. it is incredi
is alive this morning. we say hey y'all. fine folks from mississippi. >> tupelo, mississippi. >> home of elvis presley. thanks for being here this morning. let's show what you can expect today. wilmington, north carolina, hello to everyone watching us this morning, wect. watch for scattered thunderstorms today and temperature right around 85 degrees. it is the same old story for us in the southeast. more showers and storms, including the carolinas, up to the virginias. the rest of the country, primarily dry. hot, especially in the west. exacerbating the fire issues out there. forecast, stalled front across the southeast, more showers and storms. looking beautiful >>> hey, thanks, mike. good morning to you. 8:07. back to work monday. this is san francisco where you can see that compressed marine layer. let's show you what it looks like now on the golden gate bridge where you can hardly see anything at all. please travel cautiously. 72 degrees in the city headed your way. elsewhere, we do have a chance for thunderstorms and we have a red flag warning in place for today, tomorrow, all th
can't get fresh salmon. >> mississippi number two, alabama number three. >> bad accents. >> we're the craziest state. >> california tops the list. >> craziest state and you adopt even mention florida? come on. that doesn't make sense at all. >> i've lived in florida and florida has all the of the weirdest news stories. don't certain websites have pages just devoted to florida weird news. >> u.s. news, foreign news, sports, florida. >> colorado also has a lot of weird news. >> fun to talk about. everyone has their own opinion. >>> a sad scene, hundreds of dolphins mysteriously dying along the east coast. why is this happening and what does it have to do with humans? >> and is today the day the -- >> boy band. >> i shouldn't read this. what do i know. it's 'n sync, are they getting together? brand-new evidence your favorite boy band and needless to say mine is making a comeback. >> nervous, tucker is reading this one. he does have all their albums. we're new to town.ells. welcome to monroe. so you can move more effortlessly... we want to open a new account: checking and savings.
/rural divide and when you look at the whites in a state like mississippi and alabama and exit polls last year and 2008 as well, 90%-plus for romney and the voting in the states is basically black, democratic and white, republican. that is what it is down there. >> and part of that is that the democrats have not shown up and made our arguments in the south. that is a big, and the southern progress fund that is part of what they are trying to rectify. if all you hear is vitriol that is on one side of the argument, and if we are not there. alvin greene was our candidate for senate in south carolina, and people say, it is pointless and we will never win, and my point is just that we are never going to effect change if we are not there to at least make the case and show something different. >> that is the legacy of redistricting, too, because the democrats no longer feel they have to campaign or spread a moderate progressive message in that part of the country. and michael, this information is coming to day after the president was in arizona and had protesters outside of one of his speeches singin
in mississippi and make you jump through hoops. the schwag the federal government is growing isn't that good anyway and doesn't let you study a lot of different strains. it could be so simple and easy to do actual scientific research on marijuana but the government stands in the way. >> where is the obama administration on this part of the question? where has the obama administration been on the scientific question here? >> scientifically they've been great. they've said, look, we're not going to get in the way of the states. this is what they've said. the states that have passed medical marijuana laws. in practice, the d.e.a. has been kicking in doors in california, washington, montana, colorado. wherever there's a medical marijuana law, there are u.s. attorneys there spending a lot of time and resources to try to tackle what they see as a problem. it takes six to nine months, a former administration official told me, to run one of these investigations on a pot shop. these pot shops are advertising in the yellowbook and in the alt weeklies and have store fronts with pot leaves on them. it s
been covered, texas, mississippi and alabama, ushered in photo id requirements that had been previously held at bay by the voting rights act. weakening opportunities and broadening id requirements any day. and now there's florida where five counties had been covered by the voting rights act, the republican governor is restarting an effort that he says is designed to purge the voter roles of noncitizens but that a lot of people believe is an attempt to purge the roles of democrats. when rick scott tried this last year, he was stopped by the voting rights act. last time as the "new york times" reports the attempt at unearthing noncitizens initially began with a pool of 182,000 names of potential noncitizens. that was wid ld to a list of 2,600. those names were sent to election supervisors who found many were in fact citizens and ultimately the list of possible noncitizen voters shrank to 198. of those fewer than 40 had voted illegally. we'd like to remind you of one of the people who was caught in the dragnet. >> bill, a 91-year-old army veteran of world war ii who earned the bronze star
. mississippi has just the one clinic in jackson. that one, the republicans are fighting to close that one down as well and it seems like they may be close to doing it. in north dakota, same deal. there's one clinic for the whole great big state. this spring republicans passed a law that aims to shut down that one last clinic. in alabama, there are five clinics that provide abortion services. republicans passed laws in the spring that would close three of the five clinics. in virginia, the number of clinics right now is at 20. it's slated to go to four. in north carolina, 16 facilities, republicans passed new restrictions that are expected to close 15 of those. 15 of the 16. so this is before the republican party in north carolina launched its efforts to shut down clinics and this is likely to be after. it is sometimes difficult to explain this larger trend of republicans creating these new impossible to meet demands on abortion clinics. these legal requirements designed to shut clinics down. in the aning a stran ing ing a, imagine what that means. in the specific, when it's happening it seems
feel like they can go ahead. so texas first. maybe alabama. maybe mississippi. maybe north carolina after today. sometimes you use the bully pulpit. sometimes you have the authority to weigh in and stop something directly. sometimes when you lose that authority, as justice department did during the, with the voting rights act case. sometimes when you lose that authority, you instead decide you're going to sue. what is the range of options available to you? and how do you use it? how do you still try to make progress when some avenues toward the progress you want to make are blocked? on the issue of drugs and criminal justice, the obama administration made it a priority to try to reduce the huge disparity in sentencing for crack cocaine versus powder cocaine. i mean, if cocaine is the problem, why be so much more lenient for one variety of cocaine and so much more strict for the other? o on that issue, the administration found a lot of allies in congress. the build to reduce those sentencing disparities between crack cocaine and powder cocaine, that bill passed by a voice vote in the
ring from lookout mountain, from every hill and molehill from mississippi. from every mountain side, let freedom ring, there is in the scope and grandeur and fragrance of those words the very picture of this land, and this remarkable man managed to raise up civil rights as american rights, as american as the land god gave us. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. \s. >>> i'm live tonight from washington, d.c. tonight's lead, a tas
wants to hear freedom ring. every mole and mole hill of mississippi. you know that portion of the speech, right? at the 50-year anniversary of that moment at 3:00 p.m. tomorrow, bells are going to ring in d.c. and across the country and even apparently in places as far away as switzerland and japan. that's tomorrow afternoon. here's the other thing you need to know for tomorrow, though. even if you're not in a place where you can watch tv during the day, take a note of this for tomorrow night. this is something that never happens. tomorrow night, wednesday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern, msnbc has moved heaven and earth to get permission to air the "i have a dream" speech uninterrupted in its entirety. you think you have heard the whole speech, but you really probably haven't. access to the tape of the speech is very, very highly restricted. it is almost impossible to get permission to play even any large piece of it, let alone the whole thing. but tomorrow here on msnbc, at 8:00 p.m., we have moved heaven and earth to be able to play "i have a dream" uninterrupted in full. you should plan t
mississippi river valley. sunny and hot in the pacific northwest. heat continues in the southwest. sunday, sunday, a gorgeous day from the great lakes into new england. more wet weather, though, mid-atlantic state down into the southeast. atlanta is over 200% of the rain it should have for this time of the year. we're also looking at a lot of >> good morning. there is a chance for some light rain showers to start today. some scattered strong thunderstorms will develop this afternoon. >>> that's your latest weather. >>> thanks. every day there is a new health study out. everything from cutting your cancer risk with with garlic to why youight not be get a good night's sleep. >> here to break down the biggest headlines in health are here and adam the director of gynecology in connecticut. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> first, we have been talking about this one, first out of canada, a study showed 30 to 40% of couples are sleeping apart. >> that's right. i don't think it's just in canada. the u.s. surveys have this as well. but the good news is it's not necessarily a bad thing. slee
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